The-F-Word.org

Oldie but goodie: 10 questions for Gina Kolata

27th July 2010

Oldie but goodie: 10 questions for Gina Kolata

by Rachel

I took a week off work this week, but it’s more like a staycation than a vacation. The pregnant foster cat was considerate enough to give birth yesterday morning, so now I can get to that impossibly long to-do list I’ve been mentally tabulating since, oh, February. I probably won’t be online much this week, so I thought it would be a good chance to revisit some of the more popular posts featured on the blog in the three-plus years it’s been online. The first to be (re)featured is this November, 2007 interview with Gina Kolata, award-winning science and medicine reporter with The New York Times and author.

Gina Kolata is an award-winning science and medicine reporter for The New York Times and the author of many books, including, “Clone: The Road to Dolly and the Path Ahead”, “The Baby Doctors: Probing the Limits of Fetal Medicine“, “Sex in America”, the best-selling “Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It” , and “Ultimate Fitness: The Quest for Truth about Health and Exercise.”

Her new book is “Rethinking Thin: The New Science of Weight Loss — and the Myths and Realities of Dieting.”
Gina Kolata - Rethinking Thin

Kolata’s career in journalism began when she joined Science magazine in 1971, where she selected reviewers for manuscripts. She eventually became a writer and then senior writer. She also wrote for a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, including Science Magazine, Smithsonian, GQ and Ms. Magazine. She earned her bachelor’s degree in microbiology and her master’s degree in applied mathematics from the University of Maryland. She studied molecular biology at M.I.T. in a Ph.D. program.

In Ultimate Fitness, you set out to discover the truth of the exercise industry and found much of fitness claims to be misleading. In your most recent work, Rethinking Thin, you blast those in the obesity industry, who promote the idea that overweight is unhealthy and diet and exercise to be effective. What prompted your interest in the study of diet, exercise and weight-loss?

I got interested in the exercise industry because I spend a lot of time exercising and at gyms and I kept hearing all sorts of things that did not seem to make a lot of scientific sense, like the “fat-burning zone.” I was interested in diet and weight loss because of my experience as a reporter. I have been writing about major research on weight and weight loss for decades, and these often involved discoveries that seemed pathbreaking. Yet the public, and the diet industry, kept on saying that all you have to do to lose weight is just eat less and exercise more.

What are some of the biggest core beliefs of dieting and weight-loss that you found to be incorrect?

The idea that anyone can be arbitrarily thin is at the top of the list. Then comes the idea that thinner people could easily be fat if they just let themselves go. Or the idea that people gain weight because they have emotional problems and are using food to fill an unmet need. Or that if you just walk for 20 minutes or so a day those unwanted pounds would melt away. Or that if you take junk foods out of the schools and re institute pe kids would not gain weight.

Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Fitness/Exercise, Health, Nutrition & Fitness, Interviews, Mind & Body, Rachel | 3 Comments

23rd February 2010

NEDAW: Eating disorders’ forgotten victims

by Rachel

This month is Black History Month and this week is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, and Stephanie Armstrong addresses both in an interview on “Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys,” an interactive, live Internet talk-radio show that focuses on “providing people with tools to enrich and advance their lives mentally, physically, monetarily and emotionally.”  Stephanie  is the author of the new memoir Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat: A Story of Bulimia, in which the now 40-something, recovered, married mother of one daughter and two stepdaughters documents her descent into bulimia in her early 20s and describes her struggles as a black woman with a disorder consistently portrayed as a white woman’s disease.  The Brooklyn native also examines the “bootylicous” black woman stereotype and why the black community’s “code of silence” often leaves black women with eating disorders suffering in silence.  The work is being hailed as the first book by and among black women about eating disorders.  You may remember that Stephanie also answered the-F-word’s questions a few months ago.

Guests included Stephanie and Laurie Vanderboom, program director for the National Eating Disorders Association, which sponsors and coordinates National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.  A few interview highlights

Joy: What do you (NEDA) see when you have these programs?  Do you see a lot of African American women coming to the programs?

Laurie: We’re just beginning to and we’re just beginning to reach out.  There’s so much shame involved in an eating disorder that people hesitate to step up.  Stephanie, wouldn’t you agree that no matter what your racial make-up…

Stephanie: Absolutely, but especially coming from a culture that doesn’t support therapy, that doesn’t support getting outside help, and risking falling outside of the strong black woman archetype that we’re raised believing and have to become.  It’s hard to disassociate yourself with that image to get the help you need.

———————————-

Stephanie: One of the things I always talk about, especially in the black community, is that we don’t have an awareness of what exactly bulimia is.  It’s like you go to someone’s house and they’re drinking that dieter’s tea.  That’s bulimia.  Laxative abuse is bulimia.  Diuretic abuse is bulimia.  Compulsive exercising is bulimia.  It’s like we think it’s just throwing up, but it’s not just throwing up.

———————————-

Joy: I was talking with a professor of mine and he mentioned that psychologists don’t diagnose African American women properly with eating disorders, because they’re not used to seeing a African American woman coming to their office with this issue. Stephanie, do you feel that that’s the case?

Stephanie: Absolutely. Absolutely. I am constantly talking to women — some who are therapists, some who are young — who are constantly misdiagnosed. I’ve had doctors say, ‘Oh, you don’t have an eating disorder. African Americans don’t have eating disorders.’ I had a young woman call me yesterday – she goes to Clark Atlanta College and she’s at the American University in DC working on an exchange and she’s doing a paper in journalism and decided to do a paper on blacks and eating disorders because her aunt was bulimic and died from it. She calls me up and she said her teacher said, ‘Well, the problem is that there aren’t really that many black women with eating disorders, so that’s going to be a hard paper to do.’ It’s that overall belief that we don’t exist. (she briefly cites a rundown of research showing the prevalence of eating disorders among black women and girls, including this study) …the research is seeping in, but it’s still not getting the attention.

And it’s not just black women with eating disorders who are thought to be virtually non-existent.  Running Tiptoe recently posted a review of a recent “Intervention” episode featuring an Hispanic woman with an exercise addiction and a history of bulimia.  In her review, she offered this link to this 2006 study of “eating disturbances among Hispanic and native American youth,” in which it was found a much more significant pattern of disordered eating behaviors than previously thought.  There are more stats and studies on Hispanic women and eating disorders listed in this 2003 news report.*

Despite all the evidence to the contrary, eating disorders continue to persist in public opinion as a disease young, white girls from middle-class and wealthy backgrounds develop.  But eating disorders are the great equalizers: food is one of the few legal “drugs” out there; everyone needs it to survive;  and in industrialized nations, at least, is widely available and relatively cheap.  That, combined with the constant affirmations of weight loss as morally good and idolization of thinness saturating virtually every facet of our lives, and it’s no wonder that  those with emotional issues and unfulfilled needs might turn to food and the body to express a pain they cannot put into words.

Black girls and women with eating disorders.  Hispanic girls and women with eating disorders.  Adult women with eating disorders.  Boys and men with eating disorders.  Orthodox Jewish girls and women with eating disorders.  Poor girls and women with eating disorders.  We. All. Exist.

* For more information on eating disorders amongst non-white populations, see here.

posted in Anorexia, Binge Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Class & Poverty, ED-NOS, Eating Disorders, Gender & Sexuality, Interviews, Mental Health, New Research, Purging Disorder, Race Issues, Rachel, Recovery | 5 Comments

17th September 2009

10 Questions for Stephanie Armstrong

by Rachel

Stephanie Armstrong - Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat

Stephanie Armstrong is the author of the new memoir Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat: A Story of Bulimia, in which the now 40-something, recovered, married mother of one daughter and two stepdaughters documents her descent into bulimia in her early 20s and describes her struggles as a black woman with a disorder consistently portrayed as a white woman’s disease.  The Brooklyn native also examines the “bootylicous” black woman stereotype and why the black community’s “code of silence” often leaves black women with eating disorders suffering in silence.  The work is being hailed as the first book by and among black women about eating disorders.

A playwright and screenwriter currently living in Los Angeles, Stephanie’s commentary on black women and eating disorders, “Digesting the Truth,” has been featured on NPR.  Her work has appeared in Essence, Sassy, Mademoiselle, and Venice magazines, among other publications. She authored the screenplay for Contradictions of the Heart (20th Century Fox), starring Vanessa Williams, and her plays Three Stories Down, The Outside Sisters, and The Long Journey Home have been performed in theaters in Los Angeles and New York.  Her essay on bulima, “Fear and Loathing,” is included in the forthcoming anthology The Black Body (Oct., 2009).  She also sold a TV treatment, Kimchi and Cornbread, which led to a talk-show deal with MTV.

Now in a must-read interview, Stephanie takes the time to respond to questions from me and the-F-word readers.

Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Body-Affirming, Book Reviews, Bulimia, Class & Poverty, Eating Disorders, Family Issues, Health, Nutrition & Fitness, Interviews, Mental Health, Race Issues, Recovery | 11 Comments

31st August 2009

Your questions for Stephanie Armstrong

by Rachel

The wonderful Stephanie Armstrong has agreed to be featured in an interview here and I’m soliciting readers’ questions to submit to her.  I blogged about Armstrong last Friday — she’s the author of the new memoir Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat: A Story of Bulimia.  Armstrong — now a recovered, married mother of one in her mid-40s — documents her descent into bulimia in her early 20s and describes her struggles as a black woman with a disorder consistently portrayed as a white woman’s disease and why black women often do not seek traditional therapy for emotional problems.  The work is being hailed as the first book by and among black women about eating disorders.  For more information, see Armstrong’s website.

The interview format will be 10 questions.  Do you have a question you’d like to see answered?  Post your burning questions in the comments below and it may be among those selected.

posted in Book Reviews, Bulimia, Eating Disorders, Interviews | 5 Comments

12th May 2009

Taken from Twitter: Links roundup

by Rachel

Here are some recent links taken from The-F-word’s Twitter feed.  Have any headlines to share?  Post links or discuss those listed here in the comments below.

Does the hullabaloo about weight stem from health concerns, or is it all about superficial appearance?  An Associated Press-iVillage poll raises doubts.

Half [of women polled] don’t like their weight, even the 26 percent of those whose body mass index or BMI — a measure of weight for height — is in the normal range.  About one-quarter of the women surveyed said they’d consider plastic surgery to feel more beautiful. Their overwhelming choice: a tummy tuck.

Eating disorders aside, normal-skinny doesn’t automatically mean healthy, stresses University of Houston sociologist Samantha Kwan, who studies gender and body image.

“Someone who is fat or even overweight can be healthy if they have a balanced diet and are physically active,” Kwan says. “Our culture really does put a lot of pressure on women to look a certain way,” taking precedence over health measures.

Carrie at ED Bites addresses the allure of eating disorder books, as discussed in yesterday’s post on the new novel Wintergirls.  Carrie, the author of Running on Empty, writes:

It’s something I realize I have done with my memoir, and it’s not something I’m proud of. I went to great efforts during the writing of my second book to tone down as many of the lurid details as possible while still maintaining a narrative. People with eating disorders can be triggered by a wide variety of things, and these triggers are everywhere: supermarket tabloids, The Biggest Loser show, nutrition and “healthy eating” articles, you name it. Part of recovery is learning how to manage these triggers, whether it’s knowing that images in magazines are Photoshopped, or eschewing those magazines entirely.

I don’t believe in banning books but I do believe in being cautious about what I encourage my friends and family to read, especially when books can inadvertently play into the ED mindset.

A new report confirms that women are more likely than men to suffer mental illness, and stresses the need to address gender disparities in treatment.  Among other findings in “Action Steps for Improving Women’s Mental Health,” by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH):

[W]omen are nearly twice as likely as men to suffer from major depression. They are three times as likely to attempt suicide, and they experience anxiety disorders two to three times more often than men.

The new report also underscores the relative young age at which mental illness often sets in for both males and females. Half of all mental illnesses occur before age 14, and three-fourths occur by the age of 24, according to the publication. Among the more common mental illnesses seen among young women: eating disorders, which can start in advance of puberty and yet last a lifetime.

Dawn Langstroth, the daughter of singer Anne Murray, is the subject of this Canada.com story, which also lists helpful tips for parents on how to prevent eating disorders in their children.

“The minute you start talking about it is the minute you start getting better,” Dawn Langstroth tells me. She should know. The tall, striking 26-year-old singer-songwriter started talking openly about her struggle with anorexia nervosa seven years ago, and it has been all uphill since then.

Which is to say, a tough uphill battle toward a cure that may elude her for many years yet. That’s what you call good progress in the world of eating disorders, where getting better takes heroic strength and courage — not to mention boundless support and unconditional love from family and friends.

English actress and TV personality Natalie Cassidy says she now regrets making her Then and Now Workout in 2007 shortly after losing more than 50 pounds.   She went on to gain three dress sizes after struggling to maintain her dream figure in the aftermath of the DVD’s success.

Confirming that she resorted to drastic measures to stay slim, she added: “I would take laxatives before I went to bed which was very dangerous and very stupid. I started doing this about three or four months after doing the DVD.”

Cassidy has previously confessed that she was “bordering on having an eating disorder” at the time of the press attention which surrounded her weight.

In what some are dubbing the “Supergirl” epidemic, the pressure to have it all and be perfect is harming young girls.  The Inside Bay Area reports:

In what may be the ultimate irony, there’s never been a better time to be an American girl — or one that’s as risky. Teen suicide, depression, cutting and eating disorder rates are soaring. In 2004-05 suicide rates jumped 76 percent for tweens and 32 percent for teenage girls ages 15-18, according to the Centers for Disease Control. And some experts say the troubling mental health statistics have much to do with the crushing burden society puts on teenage girls.

Do eating meals together as a family produce healthier, well-adjusted kids?  A new Canadian study suggests yes:

The latest study to trace the benefits of gathering around the table shows Canadian kids in grades six to eight drink less pop, eat less fast food, skip fewer breakfasts and even think they make healthier food choices when out with their friends, if they dine more often with their families.

Jezebel dishes on a new Saudi Arabian “beauty” pageant that judges burka-clad contestants on the basis of their inner “beauty.”  Different culture, same trappings?

Through removing the physical aspect of the so-called beauty pageants, Miss Beautiful Morals reveals our own ambitious relationship to beauty queens. It also raises a whole new set of questions about obedience – for, although the Miss USA competition is not explicitly about obeying in the same way that Miss Beautiful Morals is, we still require them to adhere to a strict set of moralized rules and regulations – and to prove their complete devotion to an empty title.

The Washington Post has a touching story on Sarah Siskin, a 19-year-old college student who recently died from complications related to bulimia.

A growing consensus suggests that for young people with eating disorders, the sooner the problem is identified and aggressively treated, the better the chance of recovery. It is a truth that haunts Sarah’s family; the tragedy of a teenager’s funeral is all the more poignant when there is an underlying question of whether the loss could have been prevented; when those left behind cry not just for the person who is gone, but for the missed moments and lost opportunities that might have saved a life.

A new study of more than 180 female student dietitians reveals a sizeable bias in how they view — and treat — fat people.  Only two percent demonstrated positive or neutral attitudes towards fat people.  The others?

• More than 40 percent of students reported that they believe obese individuals are lazy, lacking in willpower and are self-indulgent.

• The majority of students surveyed also agreed that obese individuals have poor self-control, overeat, are insecure and have low self-esteem.

• Students rated obese patients as being significantly less likely to comply with treatment recommendations and as having worse diet quality and health status compared with thinner patients, despite the fact that all patients were described as healthy adults.

Follow The-F-Word on Twitter here, and if you don’t already, be sure to also follow ED Bites’ Carrie for some good reads on issues and studies related to eating disorders and how we perceive weight in general.

posted in Anorexia, Body Image, Book Reviews, Bulimia, Family Issues, Fat Bias, Feminist Topics, Fitness/Exercise, Health, Nutrition & Fitness, Interviews, Mental Health, Mind & Body, New Research, Recovery | 1 Comment

29th September 2008

Answered: Your questions about Health at Every Size

by Rachel

In July, I asked readers for their questions on Health at Every Size to be answered by a registered dietitian who promotes the practice. The original dietitian became unavailable, so I asked fellow ASDAH member Deb Kauffmann to step in. Deborah is a registered dietitian and a licensed dietitian/nutritionist currently in private practice in Baltimore, Maryland. She has provided HAES nutrition counseling for disordered eating to adults and teens, as well as children and their families, since 1990, and is one of the pioneers of the non-diet approach to weight management in the Baltimore area. In addition to nutrition counseling, Deborah offers Largely Positive, a free support group for adults of size promoting how to be happy and healthy at your natural weight.

Read the questions and Deborah’s answers after the jump…

Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Body Image, Eating Disorders, Fitness/Exercise, Health, Nutrition & Fitness, Interviews | 6 Comments

3rd July 2008

Listen to me and others live today at 11 a.m. on 89.3 WFPL

by Rachel

Myself, Peggy Howell of NAAFA and Nancy Kuppersmith, a University of Louisville dietitian who subscribes to the Health at Every Size approach, will be on radio station 89.3 WFPL’s State of Affairs show today at 11 a.m. EST to discuss issues of weight and weight-based discrimination.

Listen to live streaming audio at the show’s website here.

The show will talk for about 20 minutes and then will accept calls for the rest of the hour. If you want to chime in with your own thoughts and experiences, call (502) 814-TALK, toll-free 1-877-814-TALK, or email soa@wfpl.org.

Here’s the show description on its website:

Fat is an epidemic, the media and advertisers tell us, while playing random footage of overweight people’s midsections. Fat is dangerous! Fat can kill you! Fat people could lose weight easily if they’d just eat less! A growing movement is working to get out different, perhaps startling messages: Fat is okay. Fat is not a moral failing. Even: fat is fabulous. Join us this Thursday to learn more about the fat acceptance movement – its goals, why its important, and what its detractors say.

Hope you can join the conversation!

posted in Fat Acceptance, Interviews | Comments Off

28th April 2008

10 Questions for Kristin ‘Lou’ Herout

by Rachel

“Voluptuous women needed… for student photography project (no worries, no nudity). If you’re in your 20’s, got real booty, boobs or hips, please help me out!”

So read an advertisement posted by communication graduate student Kristin ‘Lou’ Herout last fall throughout buildings on her Northern Illinois University campus.

The 23-year-old graduate student and professional photographer replicated advertisements from Cosmopolitan, Elle and other women’s fashion magazines using not industry standard size-zero models, but rather “curvy” and “realistic” women to accompany a scholarly paper on the subject. “Basically, I just want people to see what it would be like if plus-size models were represented similarly to slim models,” said Herout.

Kristin Herout
Click to see larger resolution image

The Dekalb, Ill. native boasts her own photography company startup, K Lou Photography, and teaches courses as a teacher’s assistant at NIU on audio and production. She’s also a photographer for one of Chicago’s premiere wedding photography companies, Essence Photography and Video. I caught up with Herout as she prepares to move to San Francisco this summer to complete her master’s degree in photography at the Academy of Art University to talk about her provocative project.

Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Arts and Music, Body Image, Body-Affirming, Fashion, Interviews, Pop Culture | 34 Comments

16th November 2007

10 Questions for Gina Kolata

by Rachel

Gina Kolata is an award-winning science and medicine reporter for the New York Times and the author of many books, including, “Clone: The Road to Dolly and the Path Ahead”, “The Baby Doctors: Probing the Limits of Fetal Medicine“, “Sex in America”, the best-selling “Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It” , and “Ultimate Fitness: The Quest for Truth about Health and Exercise.”

Her new book is “Rethinking Thin: The New Science of Weight Loss — and the Myths and Realities of Dieting.”
Gina Kolata - Rethinking Thin

Kolata’s career in journalism began when she joined Science magazine in 1971, where she selected reviewers for manuscripts. She eventually became a writer and then senior writer. She also wrote for a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, including Science Magazine, Smithsonian, GQ and Ms. Magazine. She earned her bachelor’s degree in microbiology and her master’s degree in applied mathematics from the University of Maryland. She studied molecular biology at M.I.T. in a Ph.D. program.

In Ultimate Fitness, you set out to discover the truth of the exercise industry and found much of fitness claims to be misleading. In your most recent work, Rethinking Thin, you blast those in the obesity industry, who promote the idea that overweight is unhealthy and diet and exercise to be effective. What prompted your interest in the study of diet, exercise and weight-loss?

I got interested in the exercise industry because I spend a lot of time exercising and at gyms and I kept hearing all sorts of things that did not seem to make a lot of scientific sense, like the “fat-burning zone.” I was interested in diet and weight loss because of my experience as a reporter. I have been writing about major research on weight and weight loss for decades, and these often involved discoveries that seemed pathbreaking. Yet the public, and the diet industry, kept on saying that all you have to do to lose weight is just eat less and exercise more.

What are some of the biggest core beliefs of dieting and weight-loss that you found to be incorrect?

The idea that anyone can be arbitrarily thin is at the top of the list. Then comes the idea that thinner people could easily be fat if they just let themselves go. Or the idea that people gain weight because they have emotional problems and are using food to fill an unmet need. Or that if you just walk for 20 minutes or so a day those unwanted pounds would melt away. Or that if you take junk foods out of the schools and re institute pe kids would not gain weight.

Is one’s weight a matter of genetics or lifestyle, or both?

It’s both. Genetics sets a weight range that is comfortable for you. But if you were living in a place where you could not get food, genetics would make no difference.

Are Americans getting fatter? Is there really an epidemic of obesity and especially, childhood obesity?

Americans on average have gotten heavier over the years, but the average increase is 5 to 7 pounds. It’s greater at the high end of the weight range. Women are no heavier today than they were in the 1990′s.

At the conclusion of Rethinking Thin, you cite that, in some societies, obesity used to be considered a sign of health. Why has fat transformed from something to be revered to something now reviled?

All anyone can do is speculate. Some social scientists think it is a social class thing – poorer people tend to be fatter. When food was expensive, the wealthy were fatter.

Numerous studies have emerged in the past several years showing health benefits of fat in findings that have now become known as the “obesity paradox.” Yet, these studies often get little to no media playtime, while alarmist studies purporting to show the health hazards of fat get top billing. Why are the former ignored or attacked, and the latter sensationalized?

The health benefit studies get a lot of publicity, but I agree that they seem to be taken less seriously by the public than the alarmist stories. You are as qualified as I am to figure out why. It probably has a lot to do with weight and social class and a sort of societal view that people who are fatter than fashion dictates are self indulgent and deserving of disdain.

It has been suggested that yo-yo dieting poses more of a health risk for dieters, than had they not lost the weight at all. Based on your research, do you agree or disagree?

I am not familiar with convincing, rigorous research that answers this question.

In Rethinking Thin, you contend that the diet industry often only succeeds in fattening the pocketbooks of a multi-billion dieting industry, while hopeful dieters lose only money. Why then do so many Americans continue to buy in to the thin American dream?

In my book, I discuss the work of psychologists who asked why people repeatedly diet when ever time they regain the weight. They concluded that there is a reward to dieting – at first, when the weight falls off, people feel great, in control, about to embark on a new phase of their lives. Then, when it comes back, they blame themselves for having been weak or given in to temptation. When a new diet comes around, they are ready to try again, and once again get that initial euphoria.

That may be part of it.

Another part may be the persistent messages from doctors, the media, friends and family that excess weight is unhealthy and unattractive and that all it takes to lose weight is a little bit of exercise and will power.

Despite the fact that science does not seem to back their claims, obesity researchers continue to promote obesity as a major health risk. Why has obesity become the nation’s whipping boy?

I go into this a lot in my book, but there is no short or easy answer.

At the conclusion of Rethinking Thin, you write that you see a major paradigm shift coming soon about diets that will radically change how we think about weight-loss; research, you say, that is “starting to open doors.” Yet, many in the fat acceptance movement see these same doors continuously slammed shut. Are you optimistic about the direction obesity-related research is taking?

I think the research will be revealing more and more about how and why weight is controlled. That does not necessarily mean that there will be a wonder drug that will allow people to weigh whatever they want. It may be that there are so many controls on weight that if you disable one, another will take over. And that makes sense – it is so important for survival to have some fat on your body that the brain may well have evolved lots of overlapping controls. But maybe someday society will accept what science is finding and not demand that everyone meet weight standards that are only achievable by the very few.

posted in Book Reviews, Fat Acceptance, Interviews, New Research | 11 Comments

9th July 2007

Meet the fat acceptance bloggers

by Rachel

The fatosphere’s very own Kate Harding, Joy Nash and Ashley Albin of XXLA are featured on an episode of Meet the Bloggers to talk about the growing body acceptance movement on the web. Go here to listen to the archived show.

posted in Body Image, Fat Acceptance, Interviews, Pop Culture | 1 Comment

  • The-F-Word on Twitter

  • Categories


Socialized through Gregarious 42